Skip to content | Skip to document navigation

National Archives of Australia logoResearch Guides


Royalty and Australian Society: Records relating to the British Monarchy held in Canberra


6 The Duke of Gloucester

Royal Visit 1934

Image 22: With Prime Minister Lyons and Mrs Lyons at the PM’s residence in Canberra, 24 October 1934.

Image 22: With Prime Minister Lyons and Mrs Lyons at the PM’s residence in Canberra, 24 October 1934.
NAA: A1861, 6590
Enlarge image - View image gallery

Prince Henry, the Duke of Gloucester was the younger brother of Edward VIII and George VI. He visited Australia on a royal tour in 1934. The major purpose of this tour was to participate in the centenary celebrations of the state of Victoria. He also unveiled and dedicated Melbourne's Shrine of Remembrance and the Anzac Memorial in Hyde Park Sydney.

Prime Minister Lyons first announced news of the tour in Parliament:

I have great pleasure in intimating that since the last meeting of this Parliament His Majesty the King has graciously given his consent to the visit to Australia of a member of the royal family on the occasion of the centenary of the state of Victoria. As honourable members are probably aware, His Majesty in the first instance approved of his son, Prince George [the Duke of Kent], visiting Australia. Later however, advice was received to the effect that His Majesty felt that Prince George, after a strenuous tour of South Africa, should not, in the same year, undertake another tour. Consequently, His Majesty approved of the substitution of His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester.1

The Duke of Gloucester arrived in Australia on 4 October and left to return to Britain on 11 December. From the Courier-Mail's reporting of the event, it would appear that the Duke's visit to Queensland at least was a wild success:

A dignified figure in a cavalcade of pomp and pageantry that struck an Imperial note, the Duke, his face browned with Queensland's sunshine, made a truly Royal progress through bannered streets that echoed with the crash of band music and the skirl of bagpipes, and in which cheering thousands formed living colonnades, so densely packed that they seemed a solidified mass, vital and vivid with its pulsating loyalty, pouring forth with mighty voice its affection for the King's son.2

The Duke's reaction to the acclaim was described in the Press as follows:

Generally, the people found him, as they found his brother the Duke of York, a little shy and somewhat embarrassed at the overwhelming nature of his reception.3

Administration of the Duke's visit

The organisation charged with administering the Duke's tour was the Minister-in-Charge, Royal Visit 1934 (CA 4477).

His Majesty the King in a cable dated 14 January 1934, formally gave his approval for his son, His Royal Highness Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester to visit Australia. As a result, the Prime Minister appointed Major the Hon. C W Marr, Minister for Health and Repatriation, to act on behalf of the Commonwealth in the organisation of the Royal Visit on 20 January 1934.

As the primary purpose of the Duke of Gloucester's visit was to take part in the centenary celebrations for the state of Victoria, Major Marr was to work in cooperation with the Victorian Cabinet in so far as the Victorian arrangements were concerned and with the other governments regarding arrangements for the various states. An Assistant Secretary of the Prime Minister's Department, Mr F S Strahan was also appointed to the organisation as Secretary to assist Major Marr.

Preparation for the Royal visit as far as the Commonwealth was concerned commenced in February 1934 and staff were engaged for the organisational work until the departure of the Royal tourists in December 1934. The organisational work was carried out in collaboration with the Royal Visit organisations in each state with the initial drawing up of the program being the responsibility of the Commonwealth. The cost of the visit was apportioned between the Commonwealth and the States. Much of the ceremonial part of proceedings was carried out by the Department of Defence.

The organisation making the arrangements for this Royal visit was not as complex as for previous occasions. For earlier Royal visits the channels of communication with the authorities in London were through the Governor-General or the Secretary of State. However, on this occasion the Royal visit organisers communicated directly with the High Commissioner in London, thus saving much time.

Staff appointments under Major Marr were along the same lines as the previous Royal visit organisations and included:

  • Secretary: Mr F S Strahan
  • Assistant Secretary: Mr J L Malrooney
  • Officer in Charge, Canberra Ceremonies: Mr H R Waterman
  • Transport Officer: Captain F Coldwell-Smith
  • Master of Horse: Lt Colonel L C Whitfeld
  • Commonwealth Press Representative: Mr I Douglas
  • Defence Liaison Officers: Commander J Esdaile, Brigadier O F Phillips, Commodore S J Coble
  • Postmaster-General's Department: Mr P Vanthoff
  • Railway Liaison Officer: Mr G A Gahan

Major Marr made his final report to the Prime Minister in January 1935, although some financial matters were still being finalised for a short while after this report had been submitted. Very few records of the agency still exist and the precise duration of its existence is difficult to determine.

The Duke's time was apportioned as follows: six days were to be spent in Western Australia, six days in South Australia, twenty two days in Victoria, two days in the Australian Capital Territory, five days in Tasmania, thirteen days in New South Wales and nine days in Queensland. Any remaining time was to be used as recreational time by the Duke. He was to depart Australia from Brisbane aboard the HMAS Australia, bound for New Zealand.4

It would seem that the only negative incident of the Duke's tour took place during his visit to Toowoomba:

A remarkable incident was associated with the Duke of Gloucester's final hour in Toowoomba, when, at supper at the Citizen's Ball, he was requested by a fireman to cease smoking a cigarette! The Duke was momentarily dismayed by the unusual nature of the request…

The incident, which was witnessed by a number of people near the principal table, was exceedingly regretted, as it was the only unfortunate happening in what was regarded as the most brilliant social gathering ever held in Toowoomba...When seen later, the Mayor said it was the most monstrous incident of which he had ever heard.5

Record series created by the Minister-in-Charge of the Royal Visit, as well as other related record series are:

Canberra
Series: A3522
Quantity: 1.98 metres
Recorded by: 1935–1953 Governor–General (CA 1)
CORRESPONDENCE FILES, ROYAL FAMILY SERIES, (BIRTHS, DEATHS, SUCCESSIONS, CORONATIONS, JUBILEES), 1935–1953

These files concern the major events surrounding the British royal family between 1935 and 1953: births, deaths, successions to the Throne, coronations and jubilee celebrations. The records comprise background information to these events insofar as they involve the Commonwealth, both officially and through members of the public.

A3522
Canberra
Series: A6683
Quantity: 0.18 metres
Recorded by: 1934–1935 Minister-in-Charge, Royal Visit 1934 (CA 4477)
CORRESPONDENCE AND ADMINISTRATIVE FILES

This series consists of a single file from the main correspondence and administrative series of the 1934 Royal Visit organisation. Other files from the series no longer exist and may have been top-numbered into records of the Prime Minister's Department or other agencies. This file contains the final report to the Prime Minister by the Minister-in-Charge of the Royal Visit.

The index to the administrative files is incomplete as it only records files up to 68 whilst 237 items were known to have been registered.

A6683
FOLDER CONTAINING UNREGISTERED COPIES OF CABLES AND CYPHERS RELATING TO THE 1934 ROYAL VISIT

This series consists of typed copies of Prime Minister's Department cables, decoded cyphers and press releases which have been collected and arranged chronologically into a single folder. These cables and cyphers record correspondence between the Prime Minister, the Governor-General's Private Secretary, the Australian High Commissioner in London, and the newly appointed Minister-in-Charge and the Secretary of the Royal Visit organisation relating to the establishment and early arrangements made by the Royal Visit organisation.

A6685
SOUVENIRS AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS OF THE 1934 ROYAL VISIT

Four printed items relating to the Royal Visit to Australia in 1934. They were haphazardly collected and are either souvenir publications or official publications concerning the visit. A single number system of arrangement and control has been imposed by the National Archives.

A6686
Canberra
Series: CP789/1
Quantity: 0.18 metres
Recorded by: 1934–1935 Department of the Interior (CA 27)
INDEX TO GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE (RVC SERIES) ROYAL VISIT CANBERRA CP789/1
Canberra
Series: CP789/2
Quantity: 0.54 metres
Recorded by: 1934 Department of the Interior (CA 27)
GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE (RVC SERIES) ROYAL VISIT CANBERRA, 1934

Two bundles of files containing correspondence, copies of official addresses, schedules, lists, telegrams, accounts and costing statements, maps, sketches and working programs relating to arrangements for the royal tour to Canberra.

CP789/2
Canberra
Series: CP789/3
Quantity: 0.36 metres
Recorded by: 1934–1935 Department of the Interior (CA 27)
GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO THE ROYAL VISIT, CANBERRA, 1934–1935

One bundle of correspondence, schedules, lists, maps, replies to invitations etc, relating to accommodation, transport and other facilities pertaining to the various programs proposed during the royal visit to Canberra.

CP789/3
Image 23: The Band of His Majesty’s Grenadier Guards toured Australia with the 1934 royal visit.

Image 23: The Band of His Majesty’s Grenadier Guards toured Australia with the 1934 royal visit.
NAA: A6686, 2
Enlarge image - View image gallery

The following extract from a publication compiled to celebrate the visit of the Duke of Gloucester to South Australia places the royal visit in a very Australian context and helps to demonstrate the anticipated reaction to his arrival:

South Australia, a member of a great Commonwealth, joins with her sister States in extending to His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester, a very hearty welcome.

In the cattle country of the north stockmen have turned their horses out to graze, saddles and stockwhips have been oiled and hung up.

The station natives have left for their 'walk-about' and so to the hills to tell their tribesmen that the 'White fella boss all go down to see Big King's son.'

In the farm houses scattered throughout the rich agricultural districts, the question of who is to stay home and tend the cows has long been debated, each and all are eager to journey citywards to catch a glimpse of our Royal Visitor.

The town dweller watches with critical eye the erection and 'putting together' of the decorations, and readily gives vent to his feelings if any plan may not be in accordance with his idea of a royal and fitting welcome.

The spirit prevails; the bond of affection between the Royal family and the people encircles the whole British Empire; we are proud to offer welcome to HRH the Duke of Gloucester.6

In Queensland, the Courier Mail compiled a list of hints for citizens planning to celebrate the Duke's arrival in the city. The newspaper stated, 'Police and ambulance officers, remembering incidents of other royal visits and experiences in southern capitals, have issued these 'Don'ts' to Brisbane citizens who will be in the city to welcome the Duke today.'

The list of 'Don'ts' included the following suggestions:

  • Don't let your pet dog follow you to town where he may be hurt or lost in the crowd
  • Don't let your youngsters wander away from you – if you can help it
  • Do't go out without your hat
  • Don't expect the conductors to change a pound note7

Examples of records relating to the royal visit of the Duke of Gloucester

Series: A1
Recorded by: 1932–1937 Department of the Interior (CA 27)
Royal Visit to Canberra (Prince Henry 1934), General A1, 1934/1085
Royal Visit to Australia 1934 A1, 1934/2007
Royal Visit to Canberra 1934. Visit of John Masefield and other distinguished visitors from Overseas, 1934 A1, 1934/4720
Royal Visit to Canberra 1934. Camping and Parking Areas A1, 1934/5047
Royal Visit to Canberra 1934. Police Arrangements, 1934 A1, 1934/5756
Royal visit to Canberra, 1934. Attendance of Schoolchildren at Ceremonies A1, 1934/8146
Royal Visit to Canberra. 1934. Proposed Illumination of Buildings by Neon Signs, 1934 A1, 1934/8154
City Progress Association – Lighting and Decorations at City During Royal Visit, 1934 A1, 1934/9078
Royal Visit – 1934 – Rally of Youth at Capitol Theatre (Canberra), 1934 A1, 1934/9745
City Progress Association – Lighting and Decorations at City During Royal Visit, 1934 A1, 1934/9745
Series: A292
Recorded by: 1932–1938 Works and Services Branch (CA 740)
Royal visit 1934 [includes C5977], 1934–1940 A292, C5948
Series: A432
Recorded by: 1901–1970 Attorney-General's Department (CA 5)
Royal Visit. His Majesty's Grenadier Guards Band, 1934 A432, 1934/879
Series: A461
Recorded by: 1934–1950 Prime Minister's Department (CA 12)
Holidays. Visit of the Duke of Gloucester, 1934 A461, B3/1/10
Series: A467
Recorded by: 1905–1951 Attorney-General's Department (CA 5)
Communists in Queensland – Plan for Disturbance during Royal Visit, 1934 A467, Bundle 94/SF42/46 34/1052
Series: A705
Recorded by: 1922–1939 Air Services Branch (CA 778)
Visit of HRH the Duke of Gloucester – General File, 1934 A705, 34/3/114
Visit to NSW HRH [New South Wales by His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester], 1934 A705, 34/3/146
Series: A1928
Recorded by: 1925–1949 Department of Health (CA 17)
Federal Capital Territory Royal Visit 1934, 1934–1935 A1928, 355/105
Series: A2217
Recorded by: 1941–1956 Overseas Headquarters RAAF United Kingdom (CA 1366)
Movement of Duke of Gloucester to and from Australia, 1934 A2217, 133/3/AIR parts 1&2
Series: A6006
Recorded by: 1934 Cabinet Office
Royal visit. Warships, 1934 A6006, 1934/04/18
Series: AA1972/341
Recorded by: 1950–1971 Prime Minister's Department (CA 12)
Royal Visit, 1934, and Centenary Celebrations, 1934–1935 AA1972/341, 237
Series: CP290/1
Recorded by: 1901–1939 Prime Minister's Department (CA 12)
Royal visit 1935 – Expenses of Sir Charles Marr CP290/1, Bundle 1/22
Series: CP450/7, 375
Recorded by: 1934–1939 The Rt Hon Sir Robert Gordon Menzies PC, KT, CH, QC (CP 54)
Royal Visit, 1934 CP450/7, 375

The Duke of Gloucester as Governor-General

Image 24: The Duke of Gloucester with the second ministry of Prime Minister Ben Chifley.

Image 24: The Duke of Gloucester with the second ministry of Prime Minister Ben Chifley.
NAA: A1200, L60722A
Enlarge image - View image gallery

In 1945 the Duke of Gloucester returned to Australia with his wife and two young sons, William and Richard, to become the Governor-General. The Duke replaced Lord Gowrie as Governor-General and after being sworn in on 30 January 1945, he served in the position for a period of two years. Announcing his appointment, Prime Minister Curtin said:

Australians will be deeply appreciative of his Majesty's action in appointing a member of the Royal Family to be Governor-General of Australia. All in the country will look forward with affectionate and loyal interest to the arrival again in Australia of His Royal Highness.8

The editor of the Sydney Morning Herald concurred with the Prime Minister's view. In the editorial of 16 November 1943 he stated, 'In acceding to the Curtin Government's request that the Duke might be appointed to Canberra, his Majesty at once gives immense gratification to the peoples of Australia and reaffirms the supreme importance of the Crown as the centre and symbol of Empire unity.'

However the plan was not without its opponents. In particular E J Ward, the member for East Sydney and both Minister for Transport and Minister for External Affairs in Curtin's Ministry was opposed to the plan, preferring an Australian in the position. Mr Ward's views as stated in a Cabinet meeting on 23 November 1943 are recorded in the Cabinet minutes as follows:

The Minister for Transport spoke at length on the matter… he held strongly that the Governor-General should be an Australian citizen. He suggested that it was dangerous for a member of the Royal Family to be even remotely connected with political affairs… He also referred to expenditure which would be incurred when the new Governor-General arrived… He held the opinion that… it was against the policy of the Labor movement and, moreover, that it was not in the best interests of the country.9

The first Australian-born Governor-General had been appointed by Prime Minister Scullin's earlier Labor administration and Ward thought it a dangerously retrograde step for the current Labor leaders to appoint a member of the royal family to the position. His views, however, were not supported by the majority of Ministers in either the Cabinet or the War Cabinet and were denounced in the Press. The Duke duly arrived in Australia in late January 1945.

Due to the fact that he travelled during wartime, tight security surrounded all news of his voyage to Australia. A telegram from the Federal Censor to all state censors dated 9 January 1945 set the following guidelines for the media coverage of the journey:

Until official announcement of arrival of Duke of Gloucester and party on Australian mainland no publication is permissible of any material which would indicate:

  1. Movements or whereabouts of the party
  2. Mode of transport to Australia
  3. Imminence of party's arrival in Australia

For censors' guidance, this prohibits at present any further stories associating Duke with next Parliamentary session, special Canberra preparations and arrangements for his reception.10

The concern for security was heightened when it was discovered the boat carrying the Duke and his party was being followed by a German U-Boat. The submarine was eventually sunk by the royal escort ship and the Duke's party arrived safely in Australia.

The following are examples of records relating to the Duke of Gloucester's period as Governor-General of Australia:

Series: A431
Recorded by: 1946–1972 Department of the Interior (CA 31)
Governor-General – arrangements in Canberra for Reception and Farewell, 1946 A431, 1946/3081
Visit of their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester to the NT, 1946–1947 A431, 1947/313
Series: A432
Recorded by: 1901–1970 Attorney-General's Department (CA 5)
Police Guards for Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, 1935–1944 A432, 1944/643
Commission appointing His Royal Highness and Duke of Gloucester as Governor-General of Australia and documents concerning swearing in ceremony, 1935–1944 A432, 1944/1394
Series: A461
Recorded by: 1934–1950 Prime Minister's Department (CA 12)
Governor-General Movements of Part 4, 1943–1948

This file, part of a collection of Prime Minister's Department records referring to the movements of the Governor-General, relates to the Duke of Gloucester's period as Governor-General.

A461, B7/1/1 part 4
Governor-General and Governors. (His Royal Highness) The Duke of Gloucester. Appointment, 1945–1947

This file contains a Commission, signed by Prime Minister John Curtin on 4 April 1944, appointing the Duke of Gloucester as Australia's Governor-General. It also contains the proclamation of the Duke as Governor-General, signed by both the Duke and Curtin.

The file also holds an amount of correspondence between Curtin and Lord Gowrie, the Duke's predecessor regarding the appointment, and correspondence with Britain concerning the Duke's appointment. Letters expressing thanks to the Duke at the end of his term are also contained on the file.

A461, B7/1/8
Governor-General. His Royal Highness – The Duke of Gloucester. Expenditure, 1944–1947 A461, I7/1/8
Governor-General and Governors. Governor-General, His Royal Highness, The Duke of Gloucester. Arrival in Australia., 1944–1945 A461, N7/1/8
Governor-General His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester. Publicity arrangements on arrival in Australia, 1945 A461, R7/1/8
Departure of Duke & Duchess of Gloucester, 1946–1950 A461, V7/1/8
Museum collections – Commissions appointing members of royal family as Governor-General of Australia, 1947 A461, Q370/1/2
Series: A659
Recorded by: 1939–1945 Department of the Interior (CA 31) (CA 31)
Provision of police guards for their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, 1944 A659, 1944/1/2202
Series: A989
Recorded by: 1943–1944 Department of External Affairs (CA 18)
Great Britain. Appointment of HRH the Duke of Gloucester as Governor-General of Australia – Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1943 A989, 1943/365/5/2/2
Series: A1067
Recorded by: 1946 Department of External Affairs (CA 18)
Instruction to Governor-General, 1946 A1067, IC46/36/1
Series: A2676
Recorded by: 1939–1946 War Cabinet Secretariat (CA 1468)
Appointment of Governor-General [War Cabinet Agenda], 1943 A2676, 3127/A
Series: A2703
Recorded by: 1941–1949 Secretary to Cabinet/Cabinet Secretariat [I] (CA 3)
Cabinet Meeting 23 November 1943 [at which appointment of Governor-General was discussed], 1943 A2703, Volume 1D
Series: A2910
Recorded by: 1918–1960 Australian High Commission, United Kingdom [London] (CA 241)
Appointment of HRH the Duke of Gloucester as Governor-General, 1939–1952 A2910, 404/5/254
Series: A5954
Recorded by: 1937–1971 Sir Frederick Geoffrey Shedden KCMG, OBE (CP 320)
Personal correspondence with Rear-Admiral Bracegirdle. File No 2. (Following arrival of His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester), 1945–1947

Rear-Admiral Leighton Bracegirdle, a decorated former military officer, was the Official Secretary to the Governor-General.

A5954, 48/19
Speech by the Governor-General (His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester) on the occasion of the opening of the Eighteenth Parliament. 6th November, 1946 A5954, 98/13
Governor-General. Appointment of Duke of Gloucester 1943–1947 A5954, 398/11
Press File. Governor-General. Appointment of Successor to His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester, 1946–1953

The Duke of Gloucester departed from Australia after his term as Governor-General on 19 January 1947. Sir William John McKell was appointed as the Duke's successor. McKell was unable to begin his term immediately and so the Duke was replaced by Major-General Sir Winston Dugan who acted in the position from 19 January 1947 to 11 March 1947. Dugan was replaced by Sir William on 11 March and McKell occupied the position through to 8 May 1953.

A5954, 2154/2
Series: CP2681/1
Recorded by: 1916–1953 Prime Minister's Department (CA 12)
Governor-General’s Staff – Bracegirdle L S Part 2, 1944–1955

Personnel file of Rear-Admiral Leighton Bracegirdle, official secretary to the Governor-General during the Duke of Gloucester's incumbency.

CP268/1, Bracegirdle LS part 2
Series: CP439/1
Recorded by: 1940–1945 Department of Information (CA 34)
Duke of Gloucester – Governor-General, 1945 CP439/1, Bundle 2 part 2 1/1/130
Series: M1409
Recorded by: 1922–1949 The Rt Hon John Albert Beasley (CP 84)
Photographs – JA Beasley – Unveiling of commemorative plaque, King George V Hospital – Duke and Duchess of Gloucester at Australia Club luncheon

Although due to remain in the position until 11 March 1947, the Duke and his family were recalled earlier than anticipated to England. The Duke therefore resigned from the Governor-Generalship on 19 January 1947. Major-General Sir Winston Dugan acted as administrator until the Duke's appointed successor, Sir William John McKell assumed the position of Governor-General on 11 March 1947.

M1409, 44

Assessment of his term as Governor-General

The Duke of Gloucester's Governor-Generalship was assessed by Max Harris in the Bulletin in 1983. Harris' verdict was that 'the Duke of Gloucester was our greatest Governor-General'. He justified his opinion with the following examples which illuminate the Duke's activities whilst serving in the position:

It was the Gloucester concept of the office that differed from any other of the incumbents before or since. He believed that the Governor-General had to make himself visible to ordinary Australians… And it was up to him to go to them… Within two of Australia's grimmest years, 1944 and 1945, by land and a problematical little aircraft, he covered 63 000 bush miles…

The Australians were hostile because Britain had repaid tens of thousands of Australian lives with sweet-nothing in our hour of military need. The only way the Duke could sell back the idea of Empire unity to the recalcitrant Aussie natives was face to face...(For example) on the occasion of the Japanese capitulation, Gloucester managed to be in three state capitals within the day, flying in a York and Anson aircraft.

Harris concluded his assessment: 'What a pity he had to be a Pom. And royal to boot.11

Royal Visit 1965

Image 25: The Gloucesters (left) at a picnic in Beerburrum state forest, Queensland.

Image 25: The Gloucesters (left) at a picnic in Beerburrum state forest, Queensland.
NAA: A1767, RVDD398
Enlarge image - View image gallery

The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester visited Australia again in 1965. Their visit began on 20 March and concluded on 26 April. Whilst in Australia they visited Canberra (and the Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Scheme where the Duke opened a power station), Tasmania (for the purpose of opening the Tasman Bridge), New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland. They also spent time privately with friends at Beaufort in Victoria and Bungendore and Palm Beach in New South Wales.

There was some fear that the visit would have to be cancelled because of a car accident suffered by the couple shortly before their departure for Australia. The tour went on, but due to a broken arm sustained in the accident, the Duchess wore her arm in plaster and a sling for the duration of the visit.

Photographic series relating to the visit of the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester
Series: A1767
Quantity: 0.18 metres
Recorded by: 1965 Australian News and Information Bureau (CA 219)
PHOTOGRAPHIC NEGATIVES, SINGLE NUMBER SERIES WITH ‘RVDD’ (ROYAL VISIT DUKE AND DUCHESS OF GLOUCESTER) PREFIX, 1965 A1767
Series: A2755
Quantity: 0.18 metres
Recorded by: 1965 Australian News and Information Bureau (CA 219)
PHOTOGRAPHIC COLOUR TRANSPARENCIES, SINGLE NUMBER SERIES WITH ‘KRVDD’ [COLOUR, ROYAL VISIT OF DUKE AND DUCHESS OF GLOUCESTER] PREFIX A2755
Image 26: With Prime Minister Menzies marching up Anzac Parade, Canberra, 1965.

Image 26: With Prime Minister Menzies marching up Anzac Parade, Canberra, 1965.
NAA: A1767, RVDD422
Enlarge image - View image gallery

Image 27: The Gloucesters outside Canberra House.

Image 27: The Gloucesters outside Canberra House.
NAA: A1767, RVDD30
Enlarge image - View image gallery

Examples of records relating to the 1965 visit of the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester
Series: A432
Recorded by: 1901–1970 Attorney-General's Department (CA 5)
Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester Royal visit to Australia 1965 A432, 1965/4023
Series: A463
Recorded by: 1956– Prime Minister's Department (CA 12)
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Negotiations with York House, St James Palace, prior to announcement A463, 1965/2
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester – Press announcements, 1965 A463, 1965/3
Itinerary and overall program A463, 1965/4 parts 1&2
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Visit to ACT – Program A463, 1965/5
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Visit to NSW – Programme, 1965 A463, 1965/6
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Visit to Victoria – Programme, 1965 A463, 1965/7
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Visit to Queensland – Programme, 1965 A463, 1965/8
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Visit to Tasmania – Programme, 1965 A463, 1965/9
Visit to Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Authority A463, 1963/10
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Guide for planning A463, 1965/11
Composition of royal party A463, 1965/12
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Royal standard and cypher A463, 1965/14
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Gift A463, 1965/15
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester – Commonwealth organisation including appointment of Director A463, 1965/17
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Meetings of State Directors A463, 1965/3
Image 28: The Duke inspecting cattle at Camden.

Image 28: The Duke inspecting cattle at Camden.
NAA: A1767, RVDD315
Enlarge image - View image gallery

The principal meeting of state directors of this tour was held at the Prime Minister's Department in Canberra on 17 November 1964. Included on this file are drafts of the itinerary decided upon on this date and minutes of the meeting itself.

During the meeting it was mentioned that the Duke was particularly interested in cattle judging. Arrangements were accordingly made for him to participate in the cattle events at Sydney's Royal Easter Show, the dates of which coincided with his visit.

Series: A463
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Presentation of the Duke of Gloucester Cup A463, 1965/39
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – Appointment of equerries A463, 1965/44
Possible changes in program due to accident

Just prior to her departure for Australia, the Duchess broke her arm and there were concerns that this may jeopardise plans for the tour of Australia. However, in spite of her injury, the tour went on as planned.

A463, 1965/48
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester – ACT – Anzac Jubilee Ceremony at Australian War Memorial

This file details arrangements for the Duke and Duchess to attend the ceremony at the Australian War Memorial that commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli.

A463, 1965/71
Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester 1965 – ACT – Visit to ACT school A463, 1965/72
Series: A1945
Recorded by: 1957–1974 Department of Defence (CA 46)
Visit to Australia by Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, 1965 A1945, 234/3/5
Series: A2908
Recorded by: 1930–1952 Australian High Commission, United Kingdom [London] (CA 241)
Visit to Australia of Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester A2908, V88 parts 1–3
Series: A8281
Recorded by: 1954–1973 Australian News and Information Bureau, Canberra (CA 219)
Photo albums, Royal Visit 1965 A8281, 23 and 39
Image 29: The Duke and Duchess visiting Brisbane.

Image 29: The Duke and Duchess visiting Brisbane.
NAA: A1767, RVDD384
Enlarge image - View image gallery

Image 30: The Duchess of Gloucester farewelled at Canberra airport by Dame Pattie Menzies.

Image 30: The Duchess of Gloucester farewelled at Canberra airport by Dame Pattie Menzies.
NAA: A1767, RVDD439
Enlarge image - View image gallery

Examples of records about the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester
Series: A461
Recorded by: 1934–1950 Prime Minister's Department (CA 12)
Royal family – The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester , 1934–1936 A461, D396/1/4
Series: A2910
Recorded by: 1918–1960 Australian High Commission, United Kingdom [London] (CA 241)
Royal Marriage of HRH Duke of Gloucester to Lady Alice Scott, 1935–1936

The Duke and Lady Alice Scott married on 6 November 1935. Australia's wedding gift to the couple was a £150 writing desk made of various Australian timbers.

For the wedding, Australian and other Commonwealth visitors to London could apply for seating in the Dominions Stand in Whitehall, from which they could view the wedding procession. However, it was reported to the Australian Government that 'in view of the large number of applications already received, it will be necessary to allot the seats by ballot'.

A2910, 427/1/95
Series: MP151/1
Recorded by: 1939–1950 Navy Office, Department of the Navy (CA 38)
Supply of WRANS Officers Uniform items for HRH Duchess of Gloucester, 1945 MP151/1, 434/201/3726

Notes

Chapter notes | All notes

1 Hansard, Volume 144, 28 June – 2 August 1934, p.37

2 The Courier-Mail, 5 December 1934, p.15

3 The Sydney Mail, 28 November 1934, p.18

4 NAA: SP1008/1, 447/11/4 Part 12

5 The Courier-Mail, 4 December 1934, p.13

6 NAA: A6686, p.2

7 The Courier-Mail, 4 December 1934, p.12

8 NAA: A5954, item 398/11

9 NAA: A2703, Volume 1D, Cabinet Meeting 23 November 1943

10 NAA: SP106/1, PC589

11 Max Harris, 'The Aussie Way – it did for the Duke of Gloucester', The Bulletin, 26 July 1983, pp.30–2


TOP OF PAGE